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  • Yet Another early release request.

    I know we (I) can be demanding, but I'm thinking ahead to kickoff day (which by the way, for anyone who hadn't noticed has been moved a week later this year).

    I am signing up to teach some FTC/Android Studios training sessions at the MD kickoff, because the is the best time to get large groups of teams together in the build season.
    I also realize that the way to get the most out of these sessions, is to have teams be able to follow along on their own laptops. This ensures they are ready to start experimenting as soon as they get home and wire up their hardware.

    In order to do this I want to send out a link pointing to the tools and code at least a week beforehand, and stress the need to have it all loaded up for the training.
    This ensures that 1) They have found their dev. environment, and 2) have successfully got it running on their machines.

    ### But now my dilemma is going to be: what will they be able to download? ##

    We all recognize that the current BETA SDK is missing some pretty important components (like the new sensors), so it's probably not a great idea to get everyone to download an out-of date SDK days before kickoff...

    Which brings me to my request..

    Dear FIRST...
    In order for us (the public beta testers) to maximize our impact by providing valuable training at kickoffs, is there any way that the final (or nearly final) SDK can get released shortly BEFORE kickoff.

    In other words, can we avoid the need to have teems spend their time at kickoff struggling to download a large IDE and SDK on overburdened networks

    Thanks for your consideration.
    Phil.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Philbot View Post
    I know we (I) can be demanding, but I'm thinking ahead to kickoff day (which by the way, for anyone who hadn't noticed has been moved a week later this year).

    I am signing up to teach some FTC/Android Studios training sessions at the MD kickoff, because the is the best time to get large groups of teams together in the build season.
    I also realize that the way to get the most out of these sessions, is to have teams be able to follow along on their own laptops. This ensures they are ready to start experimenting as soon as they get home and wire up their hardware.

    In order to do this I want to send out a link pointing to the tools and code at least a week beforehand, and stress the need to have it all loaded up for the training.
    This ensures that 1) They have found their dev. environment, and 2) have successfully got it running on their machines.

    ### But now my dilemma is going to be: what will they be able to download? ##

    We all recognize that the current BETA SDK is missing some pretty important components (like the new sensors), so it's probably not a great idea to get everyone to download an out-of date SDK days before kickoff...

    Which brings me to my request..

    Dear FIRST...
    In order for us (the public beta testers) to maximize our impact by providing valuable training at kickoffs, is there any way that the final (or nearly final) SDK can get released shortly BEFORE kickoff.

    In other words, can we avoid the need to have teems spend their time at kickoff struggling to download a large IDE and SDK on overburdened networks

    Thanks for your consideration.
    Phil.
    I also agree that the release needs to happen before the kickoff, but you could lessen the network stress and stress to yourself and others by a) pre-downloading the IDE itself (as it is not going to change radically over a period of days) b) When downloading the SDK, download it once and put it on a LAN location or flash drive. If you are using git clone, you can pass --depth=1 to avoid downloading a massive amount of Git history.
    FTC6460 mentor (software+computer vision+electronics), FPGA enthusiast. In favor of allowing custom electronics on FTC bots.
    Co-founder of ##ftc live chat for FTC programming--currently you may need to join and wait some time for help--volunteer basis only.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by hexafraction View Post
      You could lessen the network stress and stress to yourself and others by a) pre-downloading the IDE itself (.
      Indeed. That can be done at any time between now and then.

      Phil.

      Comment


      • #4
        I've been volunteering in New Jersey, and we've been doing training sessions to bring the teams up to speed. Before the sessions, the organizer sends out an information packet which has details about the event and strongly encourages teams to get the JDK and Android Studio configured using the instructions below. These instructions are based on the training manual, but are shorter. I've posted them before, but I've made a few tweaks.

        The helpers / FTAs at the event all have flash drives with the downloaded EXESs, too, as mentioned by hexafraction. Even with the flash drives, there is no easy way of getting all the APIs downloaded, so network access is still required during the event. If a team has gone through the simplified instructions below, though, they don't really need network access. So far, about 1/2 the teams have come to the events ready to go.


        1. Download "Java SE Development Kit 7u79" for your computer from http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/ja...s-1880260.html
        2. Install the Java 7 SDK (just click Next -> Next -> Next, but if you're short on disk space, you can de-select the "Source Code" and "Public JRE" icons during the installation)
        3. Download the FTC SDK zip from https://github.com/ftctechnh/ftc_app/archive/master.zip
        4. Unzip the FTC SDK's master.zip file to a convenient directory.
        5. Download Android Studio from https://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html
        6. Install Android Studio (just click Next -> Next -> Next, but if you're short on disk space, you can uncheck the "Android Virtual Device" option on the "Choose Components" page).
        7. Run Android Studio (the last panel of the installation may have started Android Studio for you). The first time you run Android Studio, it will prompt for some configuration options, but the default settings do not need to be changed. If you get the message, "Unable to access Android SDK add-on list", see Note 1 below.
        8. At the "Welcome to Android Studio" screen, choose Configure -> SDK Manager.
        9. Click "Deselect All", then click the checkboxes to add these items (if you're short on disk space, you can omit the items with an asterisk):
        • Android SDK Build-tools, revision 21.1.2
        • SDK Platform Android 5.0.1 API 21, revision 2
        • Samples for SDK API 21, revision 4 *
        • Google APIs, Android API 21, revision 1
        • Sources for Android SDK, API 21, revision 1 *
        • Google USB Driver, revision 11 (not needed or selectable on Mac OS)
        NOTE: Except for the first and last items in the list above, these items are under the "Android 5.0.1 (API 21)" node.
        IMPORTANT: make sure you put a checkmark in the boxes for "API 21", not a higher or lower version. Android Studio may install other versions by default (which won't cause any problems), but it will NOT install the API 21 versions unless you put a checkmark in these boxes.
        10. Accept the license for the packages, then click Install.
        11. Exit Android Studio, run it again and choose "Import project (Eclipse ADT, Gradle, etc)".
        12. Find the "ftc_app-master" directory where you unzipped the FTC SDK, then select the "build.gradle" file and click OK.
        13. Android Studio will compile. This will take a while, and it will require network access to get some additional files which aren't included in the SDK. When it's done, click the "Gradle Console" button on the bottom right and you should see a line at the end which says, "BUILD SUCCESSFUL".
        14. You may need to wait a few minutes before the next two steps will become available; Android Studio indexes the FTC SDK and may not allow you to do any more builds until the indexing is completed. Once the indexing has completed, select the Gradle Scripts node and choose Build -> Make Project.
        15. Expand the FTCRobotController node, then click Run -> Run 'FtcRobotController'.
        16. This will prompt you to run the FtcRobotController app, which you can run on your ZTE Speed or on the emulator.

        ** Note 1: Some networks (typically those in a school or corporate environment) require a proxy server in order to connect to the Internet. Browsers can usually determine how to connect to a proxy server, but Java applications such as the Android Studio usually need to be configured separately. Ask the organization's network administrator for how to connect to the proxy server. At a minimum, you will need to know the host name and port number of the proxy server; some proxy servers will require a username and password, too. Once you have this information, you can go through the rest of the instructions, but you will need to do some steps differently:
        *** In step 7, when prompted to set up a proxy server, click Cancel (don't set up the proxy server yet!) and go through the rest of the set up steps. You will receive a message, "Android SDK is up to date." Continue with the next step.
        *** At the end of step 8 (after launching the SDK Manager), select Tools -> Options and fill in the information for the proxy server. Close the SDK Manager. In the "Welcome to Android Studio" screen, choose Configure -> Settings. Under "Appearance & Behavior" -> "System Settings" -> "HTTP Proxy", enter the proxy information and close the dialog. Close the Settings dialog and Android Studio. Re-open Android Studio and re-launch the SDK Manager, then continue with the next step.
        *** At the end of step 10, double-check that all the installations worked OK. Repeat them again for any items which failed. Continue with the next step.

        ** Note 2: If the Android Studio won't start, the configuration may have become corrupted. Remove these two directories, then start the instructions from step 7:
        C:\Users\YOUR-NAME-HERE\.AndroidStudio1.2
        C:\Users\YOUR-NAME-HERE\.android
        John McDonnell
        Co-Mentor, Team 5873
        https://www.facebook.com/Team5873

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        • #5
          Excellent.... Saves me a ton of time researching this.

          Phil.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for this; this is great!

            Small detail: I was under the impression that API 21 was Lollipop; KitKat (what our phones run) is API 19. Wouldn't it be better to install the API 19 version of the SDK rather than 21?

            Comment


            • #7
              I have both installed on my Android Studio setup, with the "Minimum API level" set to 19. (I'm also developing other robot code for my Galaxy S5.) I think that, as long as you don't introduce anything newer than API 19 code into your FTC OpModes, then everything will compile and run on the ZTEs.
              (A non-FTC robot control app that I developed on my S5 runs without modification on my ZTE.)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by FTC0417 View Post
                Thanks for this; this is great!

                Small detail: I was under the impression that API 21 was Lollipop; KitKat (what our phones run) is API 19. Wouldn't it be better to install the API 19 version of the SDK rather than 21?
                The current beta project requests API 21, this was fixed for the upcoming release to API 19.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I followed John's instructions to the letter and get the following error in the "Messages Gradle Sync":
                  Error:Cause: failed to find target Google Inc.:Google APIs:19 : C:\Users\FTC\AppData\Local\Android\sdk
                  <a href="openAndroidSdkManager">Open Android SDK Manager</a>

                  In desperation, I also installed all the same things in API 19 - no change.

                  What's broke and how do I fix it?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by FTC0839 View Post
                    I followed John's instructions to the letter and get the following error in the "Messages Gradle Sync":
                    Error:Cause: failed to find target Google Inc.:Google APIs:19 : C:\Users\FTC\AppData\Local\Android\sdk
                    <a href="openAndroidSdkManager">Open Android SDK Manager</a>

                    In desperation, I also installed all the same things in API 19 - no change.

                    What's broke and how do I fix it?
                    API 19 needs the "Google APIs (ARM System Image)" John's instructions were written before they latest update which changed some library dependencies

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hey, dmssargent! It worked!! Thank you!!

                      I'm still very confused on the API 19 vs. 21 side argument so I installed both versions of the Google APIs ARM. [As I mentioned before, I had actually duplicated 19 & 21 for EVERYTHING previously.] I'm hoping I didn't screw something up, and I'll wait for the "final" instructions to see if there's anything I have to uninstall.

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