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  • #16
    I found the setup for an Android Studio wireless "adb" connection between Mac OS/Yosemite and an android (KitKat 4.4) straight forward:

    The instructions are located here:
    http://developer.android.com/tools/h....html#wireless


    Before attempting a wireless connection, make sure you've got a few things setup first:

    --- Enable your android device for development:
    https://developer.android.com/tools/device.html


    --- The Mac/OS PATH environment variable may need to be modified to reference the android platform tool kit directory, for my installation the tool kit is located here:
    /Users/[myusername]/Library/Android/sdk/platform-tools/

    Verify you've got the PATH environment variable setup correctly by typing from the terminal
    $ which adb

    If not setup correctly, here's how to update your PATH in the bash shell:
    http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/appleos...ment-variable/


    Obtain the ip address of your android:
    http://kb.k12usa.com/Knowledgebase/F...Android-Tablet


    --- In Android Studio enable ADB integration with your android
    (Tools/Android/Enable ADB Integration)

    http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9...le-adb-service


    Gook Luck...

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Philbot View Post
      Hi All

      All this wireless ADB stuff is cool, but I was wondering if there was a more mainstream approach for simply deploying new code to the phone in the robot. (if we don't require debugging)

      Phil.
      ADB actually is the way you deploy to the phone when developing apps, regardless of whether you are doing any debugging or not. When you compile and download in Android Studio then ADB will automatically detect what devices are connected and pops up a dialog asking which device (or emulator) you want to deploy the app to. This is very straightforward over USB, just plug in the phone and there it is, ready to be deployed to from Android Studio (or your favorite IDE), compliments of ADB.

      If you do not want to be tethered to a USB cable then wireless ADB is the way to go, even if you are not debugging. If your dev machine is already plugged into a wifi network then just follow the instructions to enable wireless ADB and you are good to go. If you do not have an available wifi network then you need to take the extra step of setting up a host network on your dev machine (assuming it already has a wifi adapter onboard, which most newer computers do). This is not hard to do, typically just one or two lines from a command prompt (OS command line, not the ADB terminal).

      I posted detailed instructions for all of this several weeks ago here:
      http://ftcforum.usfirst.org/showthre...ll=1#post13144

      Oddly enough, people in this thread seem to be taking the hard way and trying to figure out for themselves the exact same steps that I posted long ago in the link above. Anyway, hope this helps.

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      • #18
        [QUOTE=Jerry McManus;13598]
        I posted detailed instructions for all of this several weeks ago here:
        http://ftcforum.usfirst.org/showthre...ll=1#post13144

        What seems straight forward to you, is not so simple for me.

        The first step of your instructions is to "START WIRELESS HOSTED NETWORK ON WINDOWS".

        Your link is for Windows 8.
        I found a link for Windows 7, but the setup seems to depend on my PC having a Wireless Network Card.

        Since I'm looking for a hardwired PC-to-Wireless-Router based solution (as stated in my original query), I'm stymied at step 1.

        Can you suggest a link for the "instructions to enable wireless ADB" for a PC plugged into a wi-fi network?

        I know it's not currently running since a command prompt request:

        "netsh wlan start hostednetwork"

        return an error:

        "The Wireless Autoconfig Service (wlansvc) is not running. The Hosted network could not be started."

        Thanks.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Philbot View Post
          Originally posted by Jerry McManus View Post
          I posted detailed instructions for all of this several weeks ago here:
          http://ftcforum.usfirst.org/showthre...ll=1#post13144
          What seems straight forward to you, is not so simple for me.

          The first step of your instructions is to "START WIRELESS HOSTED NETWORK ON WINDOWS".

          Your link is for Windows 8.
          I found a link for Windows 7, but the setup seems to depend on my PC having a Wireless Network Card.

          Since I'm looking for a hardwired PC-to-Wireless-Router based solution (as stated in my original query), I'm stymied at step 1.

          Can you suggest a link for the "instructions to enable wireless ADB" for a PC plugged into a wi-fi network?

          I know it's not currently running since a command prompt request:

          "netsh wlan start hostednetwork"

          return an error:

          "The Wireless Autoconfig Service (wlansvc) is not running. The Hosted network could not be started."

          Thanks.
          Jerry's instructions turned out to be useful to me only after I finally figured out how to activate the "Microsoft Virtual WiFi Miniport Adapter" as an access point on my development machine. It's is a 6-year-old HP Pavilion laptop with built-in Wifi (Intel WiFi link 5100 AGN), running Windows 7 SP1.

          But, I think you can do the same thing on a Windows 7 desktop machine, if you install a USB Wifi dongle with the right capabilities, and the right "Virtual Router" software. After trying 2 other software packages, I have settled on "Connectify HotSpot Max" ( http://support.connectify.me/ ). That site also contains a web page that will recommend some workable USB WiFi dongles, if you're having trouble selecting one :
          ( http://support.connectify.me/article...-wi-fi-adapter ).

          As we speak, my laptop is using "Connectify" to provide a virtual AP to my new ZTE Speed phone, for which "connectify" does all of the following:
          1. "Connectify" bridges the ZTE Speed's Internet access over to my home's Verizon FiOS router, so that the ZTE Speed can do all the app and system updates it needs without a 3G or 4G wireless carrier. (Buy ZTE Speeds at the $39.99 sale price as fast as you can!)
          2. Once the ZTE Speed connected to the laptop for the first time and downloaded its ADB interface driver, "Connectify's" Virtual AP responded to all of the "netsh" and "adb" commands that Jerry wrote about. Right now, Android Studio on the laptop is running a wireless ADB connection to the ZTE Speed, through which I'm downloading and running the Android apps I'm developing. I'm also watching all of the "logcat" messages that come back from the phone.

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