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Game design should consider transportation

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  • Game design should consider transportation

    The game elements this year and last have made it very hard to host a tournament. Elements are large and they don't nest. Please consider the lowly local tournament hosts when you design games. We've had to rent U-Hauls, borrow vans, and make multiple trips to get the fields to our local events.

  • #2
    Originally posted by NEOFTC View Post
    The game elements this year and last have made it very hard to host a tournament. Elements are large and they don't nest. Please consider the lowly local tournament hosts when you design games. We've had to rent U-Hauls, borrow vans, and make multiple trips to get the fields to our local events.
    Not to mention trying to do outreach, demos etc...

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    • #3
      I've helped transport fields for many years now. The Hot Shot fields had a large center goal, but the base came off and multiple sets of these were stackable. We hauled two of these fields around Maryland and Pennsylvania in a small half-height trailer. The outside bins held the game pieces, so altogether it compacted fairly well. Our local lumber yard donated the materials for 3 fields (two working sets and a spare). A local business donated its manufacturing shop and the employees donated the labor to build the fields. All of the parts were general purpose and could be bought from multiple sources, so the cost was rather low.

      For the past couple of years - and this year especially - we've had to use our full-sized trailer to haul just two fields worth of game and field elements. The mountains do not stack well and can only be bought from one source, making the cost higher and causing shipping problems. The older game elements were made of wood and I don't remember there being many ESD issues with them. Perhaps avoiding the use of metal (the mountains) might prevent some ESD issues. The wiffle balls are sold by multiple sources, but the blocks are not - it is nice that these elements are being reused from previous years.

      Teams in my portion of the state are having a hard time buying some of these elements - it was easier to obtain the local material and donated labor than to obtain monetary donations. With the higher cost of single-source elements (mountains mostly) buying field elements is expensive. Being able to buy these pieces from multiple sources might bring the cost down.

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